DISSOLVE:

EXT. WOODEN GARAGE - DAY

The ten Dodge trucks, their backs covered in O.D. green canvas, each containing four men and two big, Hotchkiss machine guns, sit in a line with the their engines running, all waiting . . .

Our Marines with their Vietnamese driver pull up beside the first truck in the line.  Capt. Houghton speaks to Lt. Cates.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Lieutenant Cates?

                                                                 CATES
                                Yes, sir.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Good.  I'm Captain Houghton.

                                                                 CATES
                                Yes sir.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Let's get moving, if you please.

Capt. Houghton points his stick and the column of trucks drives off up the road.  The Marine's truck falls in behind and they all speed off in a caravan.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. THE PARIS-METZ HIGHWAY - DAY

The ten trucks of the 7th Motorized Machine Gun Battalion, as well as the one truck of Marines, race up the main road running east, the Paris-Metz Highway - a paved, two-lane road.  The trucks are brought to a dead halt as they are engulfed in a multitude of REFUGEES.  Old women, old men, young kids - no men anywhere near draft age - carts, wagons, goats, cows.  Also quite a few French soldiers, their blue uniforms shredded, bloody, and torn; they are defeated and drunk on stolen wine.  The battered FRENCH SOLDIERS say to the passing Americans:

                                                                 FRENCH SOLDIER #1
                                La Guerre est fini!

                                                                 FRENCH SOLDER #2
                                Fini la guerre!

INT. MARINE'S TRUCK - DAY

In the back of the truck Bonner asks Daly.

                                                                 BONNER
                                Hey, sarge, what're they sayin'?

                                                                 DALY
                                They say the war's over.

                                                                 BONNER
                                Is it?

                                                                 DALY
                                For them, maybe, but not for us.  We're just
                                startin'.

Everybody nods and grunts.

EXT. CHATEAU-THIERRY/ THE MAIN BRIDGE - LATE AFTERNOON

The sun is beginning to set on the small town of Chateau-Thierry, with the Marne River running right beside it.  Most of the town has been bombed to smithereens and the place is deserted.

All that remains of the French army are SIX, BLACK, FRENCH COLONIAL SENEGALESE SOLDIERS (including a SERGEANT, a CORPORAL, and four Privates) guarding the main bridge across the Marne River.  These are magnificent-looking, jet-black men with white helmets, white uniforms with short pants.  They have appropriated colorful cloth and tied it around their heads, on the sleeves of their uniforms, and around their necks as capes.  They also each have their own pile of booty: a bird cage, a painting, a clock, a goat, a chair, etc.

A TITLE READS: "CHATEAU-THIERRY - MAY 31st"

The 7th Motorized Machine Gun Battalion cautiously approaches the main bridge into Chateau-Thierry.  The Senegalese soldiers put down their booty and take defensive positions.  The trucks grind to a quick halt.  Captain Houghton calls out:

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Who are you?

The SENEGALESE SERGEANT, who speaks English well with a French accent, calls back:

                                                                 SENEGALESE SERGEANT
                                Who are you?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                We're Americans, come to relieve General
                                Degoutte.

                                                                 SENEGALESE SERGEANT
                                We are French.  We fight for General Degoutte.
                                Where are the rest of the French soldiers, please?

Houghton points over his shoulder with his thumb.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                They went that-a-way.

All six Senegalese soldiers step out into the open, their colorful cloth flying.  The Americans look at them in astonishment.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                Where are you fellas from?

                                                                 SENEGALESE SERGEANT
                                We are from French Senegal.  In western Africa.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                Geez, what're you doin' here?

                                                                 SENEGALESE SERGEANT
                                We've been here for two years already, Yank.
                                What're you doing here?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Have you seen any Germans?

The Senegalese soldiers shake their heads.

                                                                 SENEGALESE SERGEANT
                                Planes and balloons, captain.  And we've heard
                                them.  They're all around.  We were ordered to
                                not let the Hun cross this river.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (nods)
                                Us, too.  Any of you men know how to use
                                explosives?

A SENEGALESE CORPORAL nods and salutes.


                                                                 SENEGALESE CORPORAL
                                Oui, Capitaine.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Excellent.
                                                           (points)
                                Let's get your, uh . . . belongings off the bridge,
                                if you don't mind.

The soldiers salute, pick up their junk and move it off the bridge.

The 7th Motorized Machine Gun Battalion, as well as the 6th Marines, all gather around Captain Houghton, who points with his walking stick.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Sgt. Daly, I'll speak with you in a second.  Lt.
                                Cates, you and your Marines go in and make
                                sure Chateau-Thierry is completely secure.  You
                                see any sign of the Boche, you high-tail it back here
                                as fast as you can.  Got it?
                                                           (Lt. Cates nods)
                                Move!

                                                                 CATES
                                Yes, sir.

Cates nods at his men and they all run off.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Lt. Bissell, set up the Hotchkiss guns in
                                emplacements all along this side of the
                                river.  Say every twenty yards, and check
                                your fields of fire.  Understand?
                                                           (they all nod)
                                Then move!

Lt. Bissell and the guys of the 7th dash off.

Sgt. Daly looks at Capt. Houghton quizzically.

                                                                 DALY
                                So, what about me?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                I made sure to bring dynamite thinking the
                                engineers might not be here yet and we might
                                need it.  Well, the engineers aren't here yet,
                                and we do need it.  I think we've got to be
                                ready to blow that bridge the moment we
                                see the Hun.

Captain Houghton points to the main bridge into Chateau-Thierry, directly in front of them.  Daly nods.

                                                                 DALY
                                That's a peach of an idea, captain.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                I don't know how to rig it, do you, Sergeant?

                                                                 DALY
                                                           (shakes his head)
                                No.  But those colored boys said they did.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (nods)
                                Lead the patrol, Sgt. Daly, and be prepared
                                to blow that bridge as soon as possible.  Under-
                                stand?
                                                           (Daly nods)
                                Go!

                                                                 DALY
                                                           (salutes)
                                Yes, sir.

Sgt. Daly runs over to the Senegalese soldiers.  Capt. Houghton points his walking stick at the town across the bridge.  He looks back over his shoulder and sighs.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. BRIDGE - LATE AFTERNOON

Lt. Cates and his Marines in two lines dash stealthily across the main bridge into the town of Chateau-Thierry.

EXT. A STREET IN CHATEAU-THIERRY - LATE AFTERNOON

Lt. Cates and his men move in quick bursts through the streets of Chateau-Thierry.  The Marines kick in doors and burst into houses and businesses - but there's no one there.

EXT. THE BANKS OF THE MARNE RIVER - LATE AFTERNOON

The 7th Machine Gun Battalion digs in setting up the big Hotchkiss guns on the south bank of the Marne River, on the opposite side as the town of Chateau-Thierry.  The Hotchkiss guns are water-cooled like automobiles.  Beside the main bridge, there is also a railroad trestle spanning the river.  The men dig holes, set up the guns, load in the ammo, cock the bolts to make sure they recoil, setting fields of fire, getting ready.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. THE MAIN BRIDGE ACROSS THE MARNE - LATE AFTERNOON

As the sun sets, Capt. Houghton paces back and forth in front of the main bridge across the Marne.  He swings his walking stick and smokes a cigarette.  Lt. Bissell runs up to Capt. Houghton and salutes.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                'Scuse me, sir.

Houghton brings his stick to the brim of his cap.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Yes, Lieutenant.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                The Hotchkiss guns are all dug in and ready,
                                sir.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Good.  Get back there and be on alert.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                Yes, sir.

Lt. Bissell runs off.

A moment later Sgt. Daly and the six Senegalese soldiers come dashing up holding a big reel of black wire which is unspooling behind them.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                How did it go, Sergeant?

                                                                 DALY
                                                           (shrugs)
                                They sure looked like they knew what they
                                was doing.

The Senegalese Corporal takes out a detonator, licks his index and middle fingers, and places them on the contacts beside the upraised plunger.  He pushes the plunger down, quickly recoiling as his two licked fingers get shocked.

                                                                 SENEGALESE CORPORAL
                                Merde!

They step to their left and crouch down in a freshly dug hole, the first machine gun emplacement.  The Senegalese Corporal strips the ends of the wire and attaches it to the contacts on the detonator.  He hands the rigged detonator to Sgt. Daly, who in turn offers it to Capt. Houghton.  He shakes his head and declines, pointing at the detonator.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                How long have you been in the Marines,
                                Sergeant?

                                                                 DALY
                                Almost twenty years, Captain.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Go ahead.  You do the honors.

                                                                 DALY
                                                           (nods)
                                Yes, sir.

Capt. Houghton turns to Lt. Bissell.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Hold your fire until I say so.  Pass the word.

                                                                 BISSELL
                                Yes, sir.

Bissell runs off to the next machine gun emplacement.  Daly turns to Capt. Houghton.

                                                                 DALY
                                You ever read Nietzsche?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (surprised)
                                Why, yes.  In college.  Why?

                                                                 DALY
                                Well . . . Do you think we're all morally
                                accountable?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (thinks for a moment)
                                To whom?

                                                                 DALY
                                                           (nods)
                                Ah.  Good question.

Suddenly they all hear the chatter of distant small arms fire.  Everybody looks up.  The small arms fire gets louder and more insistent.  Brows furrow; eyes squint; fingers on triggers tense; Sgt. Daly's hand tightens on the plunger.

Suddenly, there's Lt. Cates and his men running as fast as they can, their weapons held at high port, dashing through the streets of Chateau-Thierry toward the bridge, looking highly unnerved.  As yet, the cause of their consternation is not visible.  Lt. Cates and the Marines are two hundred yards from the bridge when GERMAN SOLDIERS, wearing black boots and pointed Kaiser helmets, can be seen chasing them.  Ten German soldiers, twenty, thirty, forty . . .

The Marines are just reaching the far side of the bridge when it can now be seen that there are innumerable Germans all over the place, as well as troop-filled trucks rolling up behind them.  German soldiers pour out of the trucks and join the chase.  As the Marines get on the bridge they have several hundred Germans behind them, firing their weapons while running.

Bullets are whizzing all over the place, tearing out hunks of stone on the bridge.  The Marines duck as they scuttle hastily across the bridge.  Daly counts the men as they come off the bridge.

                                                                 DALY
                                Two . . . four . . . six . . . eight . . . nine.
                                Damn!  There were eleven.

But nine seems to be it.  Capt. Houghton turns to the wide-eyed Daly, detonator and plunger tightly in his hands.  The Marines are all off the bridge.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Sergeant, the bridge . . .
                                                           (Daly doesn't move; the
                                                           Germans are twenty yards
                                                           from the bridge)
                                Sergeant . . .
                                                           (ten yards)
                                Sergeant . . .
                                                           (five yards)
                                Sergeant, for God's sake anyway . . .

The lead German soldiers step onto the bridge and Sgt. Daly jams down the plunger - KABOOM!!! - the bridge explodes right in the German's face.  Five German soldiers go sailing into the air, and at least twenty go down with shrapnel wounds.  The rest scatter.  Captain Houghton raises his hand and waves it.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (yelling)
                                FIRE!

The Hotchkiss guns all open fire.  Hot lead streams across the river, pouring into the crowds of Germans, caught in a state of total confusion.  German soldiers drop everywhere, the rest turn and run.  Finally, no more Germans remain upright across the river.  Capt. Houghton raises his hand.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                                           (yelling)
                                CEASE FIRE!

Bit by bit the Hotchkiss guns stop their racket.  In a moment all is quiet; just the sound of running water.  Simultaneously, all of the Americans bust into a wild war cheer.

                                                                 MEN
                                YAHOO!

They've tasted blood.  The war for the Americans has finally begun.

Capt. Houghton turns to Lt. Cates.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Where are your other two men?

                                                                 CATES
                                                           (shrugs)
                                Bonner and Swenson.  Don't know.  Didn't see
                                'em go down.  We were in kind of a hurry, sir.

Capt. Houghton nods thoughtfully.

INT. BARN - LATE AFTERNOON

Crouched behind a wagon and sundry other barn items are privates Bonner and Swenson, their rifles held tightly in front of their faces.  All around the barn is the sound of massive movement: trucks, marching men, orders barked in German.  Pvt. Swenson whispers to Pvt. Bonner.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                We shore went an' done it now.

Bonner nods in agreement.

                                                                 BONNER
                                                           (whispering)
                                Damn-tootin'.  I knew we shun't a stopped t'
                                eat that cheese.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                I was hungry, so was you.

                                                                 BONNER
                                But now m' belly hurts.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                Mine, too.

As their stomachs gurgle, we . . .
                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:


EXT. BARN IN CHATEAU-THIERRY - NIGHT

A barn sits at the edge of Chateau-Thierry.  Just past the barn we can see a whole troop of Germans, with trucks and tents, bunking in for the night.

INT. BARN - NIGHT

Privates Bonner and Swenson are still stuck in the barn, crouching behind the wagon, their weapons in hand.  They can clearly hear the Germans talking while they eat, metal spoon on metal plates, etc.

                                                                 BONNER
                                                           (shrugs; whispers)
                                I guess if we're gonna go, we best do it now.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                                           (nods; whispers)
                                Yup.  'Sides, it stinks in here.

                                                                 BONNER
                                No help from you.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                Or you.  OK . . . ?

They both nod their heads in a one, two, three count, then dash to the barn door.

EXT. BARN - NIGHT

Swenson and Bonner come out the barn door, their weapon before them.  They both peer around the corner of the barn and see the troop of encamped Germans.  The privates duck back around the corner, look at each other and wince.  Staying low, the two move off in the other direction, toward the river.

EXT. THE REMAINS OF THE MAIN BRIDGE - NIGHT

Privates Swenson and Bonner arrive at the remains of the main bridge over the Marne.

                                                                 BONNER
                                                           (whispering)
                                That's what that big explosion was.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                                           (whispering)
                                Now what'll we do?

They both look up the river, to the railroad trestle that still spans the waterway.

EXT. RAILROAD TRESTLE/ GERMAN SIDE - NIGHT

Privates Swenson and Bonner arrive at the railroad trestle, a thin-gauge, very narrow bridge over the Marne River.  It's not that it's that perilous to walk on, it's that to be out on the trestle means you are in plain view of the Germans.

                                                                 BONNER
                                It's now or never, buddy.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                You said it.

                                                                 BONNER
                                I say we make a run fur it.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                I'm with you.
                                                           (he holds up his French
                                                           Chauchat machine gun)
                                What about these?  They weigh a ton.

They look at each other for a moment, then shake their heads.

                                                                 BONNER
                                We'll git hollered at if we chuck 'em.
                                Ready . . . ?

Pvts. Swenson and Bonner nod one, two, three, then take off running, their weapons in both hands up in front of them.  They turn the corner onto the trestle, stepping a lot more gingerly as they go from railroad tie to railroad tie, twenty-five feet over the water.

A third of the way across the railroad trestle the two soldiers are spotted by both sides.  Bullets start to whiz over their heads, and dig chunks out of the wooden railroad ties they're stepping on.  The privates try to stay as low as they can.

EXT. THE GERMAN SIDE OF THE MARNE - NIGHT

We can see the FOUR GERMAN SOLDIERS firing at the privates on the railroad trestle, two hundred yards away.  The soldiers step out into the open and laugh as they fire, this is like a shooting gallery.  Suddenly, four Hotchkiss guns open fire from across the river - RAT-A-TAT-TAT-TAT-TAT - mowing down the laughing Germans.

EXT. RAILROAD TRESTLE/ AMERICAN SIDE - NIGHT

Privates Swenson and Bonner come off the railroad trestle, alive and in one piece, to the greetings of their pals of the 6th Marines, led by Daly and Cates.  They all slap the privates on the back.

Suddenly, German Maxim guns open fire across the river.  The Americans all hit the dirt as bullets whiz over their heads.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. THE BANKS OF THE MARNE RIVER (THE AMERICAN SIDE) - DAY

Capt. Houghton, Lt. Bissell and the men of the 7th Motorized Machine Gun Battalion and the 6th Marines still hold their positions in their dugout machine gun emplacements along the Marne River.

Meanwhile, across the river and in the town of Chateau-Thierry, it's nothing but Germans: truckloads of them, lines of troops marching up, horse-drawn wagons pulling Maxim machine guns - no tanks, interestingly, were used on either side in this battle.

EXT. BELLEAU WOOD (AERIAL VIEW) - DAY

A TITLE READS: "BELLEAU WOOD - JUNE 1st, 7:59 A.M."

Belleau Wood is a hilly, scrubby, bolder-strewn, wooded area, surrounded by fields of waist-high, green wheat, speckled with red poppies.  At the northern end of the wood is the old, round, stone hunting lodge.

Belleau Wood is alive with movement as the Germans move in their equipment.  One Maxim machine gun after another after another.  In short order the Germans turn Belleau Wood into a giant, one-mile-square machine gun nest containing literally hundreds of lethal-looking Maxim guns.

Two red German Fokker Tri-wing planes fly over going south.  We follow with the planes, which begin to follow the Marne River.

EXT. THE BANKS OF THE MARNE (AMERICAN SIDE) - DAY

The German Fokkers fly over Capt. Houghton and the 7th Machine gunners and Sgt. Daly and the 6th Marines.  Everyone looks up and around with increasing consternation.  And meanwhile, the Germans keep arriving across the river.  Capt. Houghton, fancy walking stick in hand, checks his watch - it's 8:00 A.M.

                                                                 CATES
                                                           (concerned)
                                I don't like the way the odds are shaping up,
                                Captain.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Me, neither.  I'd estimate the Hun has moved
                                in at least ten divisions so far, and they're still
                                coming.  That means we're out-numbered by at
                                least ten thousand to forty right now.
                                                           (none of the men really
                                                           needed to hear this statistic
                                                           at this moment)
                                I'm more than a little surprised they haven't
                                attacked already.  Their aerial spotters have to
                                know what our situation really is.
                                                           (he lines up his walking
                                                           stick like a driver and takes
                                                           a practice swing)
                                Unless they know something we don't know . . .

                                                                 CATES
                                Like what?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                That remains to be seen, Lieutenant.

Just then, right behind them a motorcycle comes puttering down the hill.  Riding the motorcycle is STAFF SERGEANT WOOD.

                                                                 WOOD
                                Captain Houghton?

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Yes, who are you?

                                                                 WOOD
                                Staff Sgt. Wood, Brigade Headquarters.
                                Your relief from the 7th will be here soon.
                                We're setting up about two miles back,
                                near a village named Lucy- something-er-
                                other.  You're to fall back.  By the way,
                                General Harbord sends his compliments
                                on a job well done.  Good work, boys.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Is there hot food?

                                                                 WOOD
                                                           (shakes his head)
                                Sorry, captain, none of the field kitchens
                                have made it up here yet.

                                                                 HOUGHTON
                                Thank you, sergeant.

Sgt. Wood salutes, turns his motorcycle around, and putters away.

Capt. Houghton turns to Lt. Cates.  They look at each other for a second, then shake their heads and sigh.  They all look across the river at the massing Germans, then begin to prepare to leave, and the sooner the better.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. CROSSROAD - DAY

American troops are marching in columns up to a crossroad, then being sent north or south by officers who are directing traffic.  Among the officers is Captain Williams.  Infantry is sent south, Marines to the north.  Our guys of the 6th Marines march up.  Lt. Cates salutes Capt. Williams.

                                                                 CAPT. WILLIAMS
                                Lt. Cates, good to see you.  Look at this, I'm
                                gone for a few hours and they've got me directing
                                traffic.  Lead the men north along this road and
                                connect up with the 5th Marines, dig in, and wait
                                for orders.  I'll be up in a while.

                                                                 LT. CATES
                                Yes, sir.

Just then, in the woods behind them, a blue-coated FRENCH MAJOR and six French officers step out holding their hands in the air.  The Americans all turn and look.

                                                                 FRENCH MAJOR
                                                           (French accent)
                                We surrender.  We surrender.  Do not shoot.

Capt. Williams turns to the French Major and his men.

                                                                 WILLIAMS
                                We're Americans.

                                                                 FRENCH MAJOR
                                                           (confused)
                                Pardon?

                                                                 WILLIAMS
                                We're Americans.  We're on your side.

The French Major looks at his men, then they all lower their hands.  Suddenly, the French Major takes on an imperious, commanding attitude.

                                                                 FRENCH MAJOR
                                Do you understand the situation around here,
                                Captain?  The Boche have taken Bouresches to
                                Chateau-Thierry.  They have many, many divisions.
                                Hundreds of machine guns.  Captain, I order you
                                to retreat immediately!

Capt. Williams looks like he just bit into a lemon and winces.

                                                                 WILLIAMS
                                You what?

                                                                 FRENCH MAJOR
                                I order you to retreat!

                                                                 WILLIAMS
                                Retreat, hell!  We just got here.

Lt. Cates and his men all grin, marching off to the north.

                                                                 FRENCH MAJOR
                                But captain, I am a major.  I order you.

Capt. Williams points at a group of American officers, which includes COLONELS CATLIN and NEVILLE.

                                                                 WILLIAMS
                                Major, I suggest that you go speak to those
                                men.  They're running this operation and I'm
                                sure they'll be more than happy to hear anything
                                you have to say.

The French Major and his men walk off to speak to the American officers.  Capt. Williams rolls his eyes in disgust.

                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. THE LUCY-TORCY ROAD - DAY

Sgt. Daly walks along the edge of the Lucy-Torcy road, just as it goes through a small stretch of woods, supervising his men as they entrench.

                                                                 DALY
                                Come on, you molly-coddles, dig them holes!
                                Dig 'em deep!  We ain't playin' games here,
                                this is the real thing!  And if you ain't careful,
                                they're gonna bury you in these damn holes!

The men of the 6th, stripped down to their undershirts, dig trenches with bayonets and mess-kit lids.

                                                                 MATTHEWS
                                Nice thought, gunny.

                                                                 SWENSON
                                I s'pose shovels would be too much t' ask for,
                                huh?

                                                                 DALY
                                You wanna shovel Swenson, join the engineers.
                                Right now, you'll dig with your Goddamn teeth if
                                I tell ya to!  Now, dig, you miserable bastards,
                                dig!

And indeed they dig.
                                                                                                       DISSOLVE:

EXT. LUCY-TORCY ROAD - NIGHT

The men are totally exhausted and lounging in their newly dug holes: sleeping, smoking cigarettes, writing letters home, talking softly.  Artillery and the occasional burst of small arms fire can be heard in the distance.  A wiry, tall, Marine with thick, dark eyebrows, comes walking up in a crouch to the left flank of our guys.  He is PRIVATE PIETRO GIANNINNI, and meets Bonner and Argaut.


                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Any of you guys know Private Charley
                                Maggione?

                                                                 BONNER
                                Sure, he's about six, eight holes up.  Who're
                                you?

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Gianninni, 5th Marines, we're the next comp'ny
                                over on your left.

Gianninni keeps moving along the line until he finds Maggione writing a letter.  Maggione sees Gianninni, grins, and shakes his hand.

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                Pietro, paisan.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Charley, my old pal.  Writin' home?

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                                           (nods)
                                Sure.  Remember Mr. Langusta, the iceman?

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                                           (nods)
                                Sure.  With the big mustache.

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                Right.  My ma says he dropped dead on the
                                stairs right in front of our door.  Big chunka
                                ice fell down eight flights, nearly killed some
                                kids playin' at the bottom.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Ain't that somethin'.  You heard from Theresa?

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                                           (nods)
                                Sure.  She writes all the time.  I'm writin' to
                                her now.  I don't write back as much as she
                                writes to me, though.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                She's somethin', that Theresa.  Best lookin'
                                gal on the block.  Show 'em, Charley.

Maggione takes a photograph out of his wallet and hands it to Swenson, Matthews and Daly.  They look at the picture, nod, then all look at Maggione with new found respect.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                How'd you ever get her?

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                                           (shrugs; smiles)
                                I didn't stop pestering her all of senior year.
                                She finally figured out it was easier t' fall for
                                me than get rid of me.

They all laugh.  Gianninni waves his hands.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                So, we finally made it, eh?

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                We sure did.  I can't wait till we show Fritzie
                                what we got.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                You said it, brother.  I don't think we got
                                long t' wait, either.

A VOICE in the distance calls out:

                                                                 VOICE
                                Officer comin'!

Gianninni starts to leave.

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Gotta go.

                                                                 MAGGIONE
                                Good t' see ya, Pietro.  Write and tell your
                                ma I said hi, OK?

                                                                 GIANNINNI
                                Yeah, sure.  You write and tell Theresa I
                                said hi.

 

Next Page >

1   2   3   4   5   6

 

[ Questions or Comments ]


BECKERFILMS SITE MENU

[ Main ]  [ Film & TV Work ]  [ Screenplays [ Old Stuff ]
[
Reviews ]  [ Articles, Essays & Stories ]  [ Ask the Director
[
Favorite Films ]  [ Scrapbook ]  [ Links (& Afterword) ]  [ Web Team ]

This site is the property of Josh Becker Copyright © 2003 Panoramic Pictures, All Rights Reserved.
Panoramic Pictures Logo