Q & A    Archive
Page 44

Name: Darin
E-mail: none

Hey Josh,

Have you ever seen "Spinal Tap"? What did you think of it?

Darin

Dear Darin:

I love it. I quote a line from it all the time, "It's a very fine line between clever and stupid." I love the song titles: "Tonight we're Gonna Rock You Tonight" and "Smell the Glove." And, of course, hen all else fails, there's always Jazz Odyssey.

Josh

Name: David
E-mail: david@dustdevil.com

Josh,

I know that there is an actor's guild, a writers guild, and a director's guild. Is their a guild for sound producers, cinematographers, or even key grips? Lastly, have you gotten any offers to do any work on Kevin Sorbo's current show "Andromeda"? I know it isn't a Renaissance production, but I wasn't sure how much say the actors (especially the stars) have in the production crew. Thanks,
David.

Dear David:

All the technical positions, below-the-line (meaning not the actors, directors, writers or producers), are covered by the union IATSE, which includes electricians, carpenters, camera-people, grips, etc. Cinematographers also have a society called ASC, the American Society of Cinematographers. I haven't spoken with Mr. Sorbo since I last saw him on the set of "Hercules." Actors generally don't choose directors anyway That's usually up to the executive producers.

Josh

Name: Roc Sandstorm
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

Running time is a masterpiece. Drugs are bad. Bye

Dear Roc:

Words to live by.

Josh

 

Dear Mr. Sandstorm,

When drugs are outlawed, only outlaws will have drugs.

Shirley

Name:
E-mail:

Hey,

I have a really genuine couple of questions...
*** Have you ever particuarly met a famous director that you really didn't like?
*** What do you think of the director- Bryan Singer?
*** AND finally, you know the film- "Teaching Mrs. Tingle", which got mountains of bad reviews even though I loved it, what did you think of it?

Bye bye my lovelies!
The one you have come to love...
WHOAH! YEH!

Dear ___:

"My lovelies"? You sound like the Wicked Witch of the West talking to her winged monkies. I haven't met many directors, really. They're all on their best behavior at DGA functions. I haven't seen "Mrs. Tingle" and I didn't like "The Usual Suspects."

What a world,

Josh

Name: Stephen Kerr
E-mail: kerrsed@aol.com

Dear Josh:

I'm thinking the scene where Carl and Janie are talking in her apartment after he gets shot. I hope I don't do it so bad you become ashamed rather than honored.

Dear Stephen:

That's your problem now. Are you related to Deborah? She's one of my favorites. I love her in "Black Narcissus." Anyone ever see it? It's really awesome.

Josh

Name: August
E-mail: joxerfan@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

On the subject of a message board - well, I for one would love to see one, and would frequent it often, but it might be more trouble than it's worth.

Diana of course knows of some alternatives, but perhaps other film geeksmight not - everyone feel free to check out the sub-forums at www.xenite.org - http://www.xenite.org/forums/fantasy_tv/jack_of_all_trades/ is for discussion of that great short-lived show, http://www.xenite.org/forums/fantasy_tv/renaissance_pictures/ is for Xena and Cleopatra discussion (although we welcome off-topic chit-chat) and there are other ones for discussion of various other shows, authors, actors, etc.

And if one is just looking for a generic message board, I have one at http://network54.com/Hide/Forum/goto?forumid=24544 where an infinite amount of film discussion is welcomed.

So entirely up to you, but it might be a nice feature here!

Regards,

August

Dear August:

You know, a message board doesn't really interest me. I'd never go there. I think we have a fairly interesting Q&A going, although I wouldn't mind more discussion about good movies, like we did recently with "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." I just purchased the DVD of "Who'll Stop the Rain," a film I really adore. Even though I've seen it ten times anyway, having just watched it again I'm thinking about it again. It's a terrific adaptation of Robert Stone's book. Anyone see the film or read the book?

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: ben@internetben.com

Dear Josh,

I always assumed that since the minimum running time for a theatrical release film is about 85 minutes, that a feature-length film would be considered the same. I don't remember how long Running Time was, but I think it was in the 70s. I just saw another film referred to as feature-length, and that was only 63 minutes. How long is a feature-length film?

Thanks.
Ben

Dear Ben:

As per the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences, it's 60 minutes. 59 minutes and down is a short, 60 minutes and up is a feature. Some of my favorite films are 60 to 70 minutes, like "Frankenstein," "Christmas in July," "The Red Badge of Courage," "Million Dollar Legs," but it's much more the standard to make feature films somewhere between 85 and 120 minutes.

Josh

Name: Stephen Kerr
E-mail: Kerrsed@aol.com

Dear Josh:

Would you be horribly pissed if I used a scene from one of your movies to perform in class? Its for Acting for the Camera at college.

Dear Stephen:

I'd be honored. What scene?

Josh

Name: Fogdog
E-mail: Fogdog@aol.com

Dear Josh:

Is going to Amsterdam an anual birthday thing for you? Or is it just a special treat this year?

Dear Fogdog:

This is my 4th time here, but the first during my b'day. It could be an annual thing, we'll have to see.

Josh

Name: Fogdog
E-mail: Fogdog@aol.com

Dear Josh:

Cheers, mate! Roll another fatty for me, Josh!!

Dear Fogdog:

All right, mate. Good on ya. I'll do it right this very second. It's a truly lovely day in Amsterdam.

Love,

Josh

Name: Jim
E-mail: Jeaganfilm@aol.com

Josh,

Any recommendations on how to make some decent cash in between film jobs? I just got out of a liberal arts school with an english degree and film/writing minor and am having some trouble finding a decent paying job to fund some short films I want to do (as well as a car, an apartment, etc.). I'm not interested in doing the whole intern/PA/office assistant route. I'd prefer to do some laid back kind of thing for awhile, just to pay the bills and actually have some free time in the evenings to watch some movies. The whole office filing/secretarial thing is totally not my bag. I figure since you've been around this block hundreds of times before, you might have some good recommendations. Oh yea, and happy Birthday. You still in Amsterdam?

Jim

Dear Jim:

Yeah, I'm still in Amsterdam. It's gorgeous. The bullshit job that I minded least and took the least time with the highest return on time and effort as being a process server. I usually worked three mornings a week, usually one afternoon, too, and was pulling down $400-500 a week. I still had most of my time to myself.
Good luck.

Josh

Name: David
E-mail: daa@hotmail.com

Dear Josh:

Yes, I read that in television, the writer is KING. Is this true?

Dear David:

No, the executive producer is king.

Josh

Name: Mariah Carey
E-mail: mc@honeybfly.com

Dear Josh:

Did u direct the Xena finale?

Dear Mariah:

No, I directed the 3rd from the last episode.

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: ben@internetben.com

Dear Josh,

I just visited a website that had some really great tips on independent filmmaking, and it also had this excerpt under "Things You Need To Be A Director: One of those chairs."

*If you're ever on a film set for a laugh try sitting in the Director's chair. A wannabe film-maker friend of mine did this and he directed half of Batman and Robin before anybody realised. *

Judging by the film, I can believe it. But do you have one of those chairs? Or is that a cliche that is as offensive to filmmakers as kangaroo comments are to Australians?

Thanks,
Ben

Dear Ben:

I don't own one, I just sit in whatever chair is supplied for me when I get there.

Josh

Name: Joey Jamell-Johnson
E-mail: FLOSS_IT-UP@WWW.BLACKPLANET.COM

Dear Josh:

Could I audition for Dark on the Moon

(405)399-5917

8100 N HIGHLAND AVE SPENCER, OKLAHOMA 73084

Dear Joey:

No, because I'm not shooting it.

Josh

Name: Diana Hawkes
E-mail: sdhawkes@penn.com

Dear Josh:

I can't help but hope you are refraining from indulging in the other "legal" umm...lesiure activity over there.

Had a friend get back from Amsterdam a few months ago and told me about "that" district.
EEK.

Is there any chance on God's green earth that we could convince you to re-install a message board here?

There are quite a bit of subjects that get touched on in these letters that I (and I'm sure other regular readers) would love to paricipate in. Even if you're not there in every thread to set us straight! How about appointing one of us homebodies as moderator to boot out the more obvious nasties?

Dear Diana:

I suppose we could. We did back at the beginning, but the obnoxious Xena fans took it over. Now that that's over, perhaps it could now work. What do other regular visitors here think?

Josh

Name: Gerry
E-mail: gerry@icweb.com

Dear Josh:

I am an ex dog... that means army... and I am proud to have served my country, and I very much loved the army when I served. I became a dog because my pop had been one during the cold war as well as my grandpa in WW I. I must say that I truly love films about the army and what they have done and I love war films. The good one. And I agree 100% with you Josh. It is profoundly stupid having the army getting a major film made about its exploits in Guadacanal... its like making a major film dedicated to how the Navy fought at D-Day. There are some real battles the army have fought that deserves notice and a film, but to pick one like that without showing the whole story is a slap in the face of the people who really won the island.

Face it, the bulk of the fighting on Gaudalcanal was done by marines and the island was won by marines. The dogs cleaned up and suffered casualties, but that was not the battle nor close to what the corp suffered in their taking of the island. You want to discuss a slap in the face is to make a film about the island without telling about the marines side.

Anyway, what was depicted in the new "Thin Red Line" was a bullshit fantasy story told by a guy who no more knew anything about what men felt who served their country as he did about the book his film was based, nor what actually took place at Gaudalcanal to begin with. The original 1960's black & white film came closer to reality, but still sucked.

And another film that I know Josh loves, that is a slap in the face of veterans is "Bridge on the River Kwai". There were no bridges destroyed, nor any character like Alec Guinness. In fact the men were primarily not on Kwai. Kwai was chosen by Beul because "it sounded better". There were no battles fought by the prisoners. The only fighting in that camp was to just stay alive. Dying of typhoid, malnutrition and malaria. Men being beaten regularly and used for slave labor by cruel guards who were from the dregs of the military barrel. The Japanese sent their worst men to the camps and best to fight the war. In fact, it was considered dishonor to be given such a post, and made the situation even more grave for the prisoners. The real prisoners whom are still alive have openly criticized the book and the David Lean film for not telling what really happened in the building of all the bridges, and that the book and film betrayed the real men and especially their camp commander who was a kind and generous man, nothing like Guinnes' character. Sure its got good story structure. It gets an A+ plus for following proper structure, but fails in its betrayal of what happened. Why bother telling the story of a real place and situation if your not going to be truthful? To this day, many of the structures these men built still stand, and are used as well as are landmarks where there are no markers that even mention how they were built on the backs of the prisoners of war. It is the betrayal of our veterans like this that is a greatest slap in the face. After I found out the truth, as a vet, I could no longer like the classic film. No more than I could tolerate the Meg Ryan Denzel Washington film where Meg's character wins the CMH postumously. As a medic officer serving in Desert Storm. I can tell you now that in reality, any officer who would have endangered a med-evac crew the way she did, would have been tried and booted out and not given a medal. To endanger your life to protect is on! e thing, but to take a team into that danger is reckless and shows poor judgement. If, as a filmmaker, you want to make a film about a historical battle or about a real life situation in the military. Know your subject. Know your history, and you'd better damn well know something about the military and the kind of people who served. Most civilians do not understand the bond that takes place between soldiers in combat. It is a deep friendship that transcends anything you see in the "real" world. People willing to die for others, willing to kill for others. Pacts made to shoot one another if the other flees in fear under fire. Dragging another man to safety while you have a round slammed in your own leg. This is what soldiers are like. Actor Lee Marvin wept and called himself a coward because he lay wounded in a hospital with a dish of ice cream, the only survivor of his marine unit, because he felt he'd betrayed his fellow marines by surviving the battle. Until one can grasp this mentality, I don't think it is possible to tell a story properly about soldiers or of war. Its this lack of understanding and respect to truth and fact that makes so many war films suck.

Dear Gerry:

Who put a bug up your ass? And get off "The Bridge on the River Kwai's" case.

Josh

Name: Ray-THESCREENWRITER!
E-mail: ray3259@excite.com

Yo there, Josh.

I've read three of your screenplays already. Which were Running Time, Stryker's War, & The Biological Clock. I really enjoyed them, but I've always liked Running Time the best.

Well, anyway, I just have a two questions for you. One being: when will you have some more screenplays up online? I know that it is a dumb question considering screenplays don't take a day. I would kown, I've been having hard times re writing and re vising my three screenplays.

The second question is: Did you ever write an early first draft of one of your scripts on paper? Loose leef? It may sound dumb but I have been trying to find out if real professional screenwriters have in fact written one or some of their scripts on paper. I wanted to know because I of course wrote a few scripts and they were all written on paper. Is that something that people criticize? Or is it something unique for some one like me to do?

I just need to know because I don't want any one to criticize me when I turn it in.

Thank you so much!

Dear Ray:

I write a lot by hand. I've written quite a few scripts by hand on yellow pads. But then you type them, and your first typed draft is really a 2nd draft. See? It's a good system. What I always liked about a pad and pen is they're very portable. That's all I have with me here in Amsterdam.

Josh

Name: August
E-mail: joxerfan@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

OK, I'll ask the million dollar question that everyone wants to know - what the &%$# are you doing in Amsterdam, beyond smoking awesome weed? (Note to the lurkers out there - it's legal there.) Vacation? Film project? And if the former, why Amsterdam, just out of curiosity?

And congrats on the posssible Anchor Bay release of"Hammer" - how did that come about? I think we need a "Making of...Pt. 3," what do you say?

Roll up a fat one for me,

August

PS - have you ever seen the TV version of Casino Royale? One of the Turner channels aired it once - it was done as one of those live TV playhouse things in the 50's, with Peter Lorre as an awesome Le Chiffre, and some unknown stocky American guy who looked like John Garfield on steroids playing Bond very badly.

Dear August:

I'm having a good time, why else come to Amsterdam. Yes, I have seen that TV version and it was OK, for a presentation with only a couple of sets. Peter Lorre was terrific, as always. It still doesn't do justice to Fleming's book, though. I really do like the originals of things, before they become self-conscious.

Josh

Name: Close... but not close enough
E-mail:

Lol... hi Josh!

I was just wondering if you didn't think it was wrong to say that you were smoking weed... don't you think it could encourage kids or young teenagers to start doing stuff like that! And secondly, why have you not answered any of my questions... and thirdly how fast do you think my lambs can knock up a website! But I'm thinking about including voice messages to my fans... what you think?

So that's three questions you better get busy! And you're getting closer and closer at guessing who I am! Lol! Good luck. Bye bye, my dolls!

Dear Close:

As Bette Davis says to Joan Crawford in "Baby Jane," "But you ARE in a wheelchair, Blanche." But I AM in a coffeeshop in Amsterdam, and I AM smoking weed. I am neither encouraging nor discouraging anything. I'm just stating the facts. Everybody must make up their own minds. I've seen many movies about junkies, but I've never tried heroin.

Josh

 

Dear Mystery Querant,

Do you think that after years of constant exposure to government prohibition propaganda like D.A.R.E., "Just Say No" and the like, that a kid reading an old guy talking about smoking a joint will immediately want to go out and do the same? If that's the case, perhaps it should be illegal in this country to talk or write about ingesting drugs (unless the drug is alcohol, caffiene or nicotine). Oh, but Josh is in another country right now, so he could still talk about it...

Shirley

Name: Blake Eckard
E-mail: bseckard@hotmail.com

Josh,

Damn, start writting a letter, get carried away, and forget to even bring up what I was originally writting for...It's really great that "If I Had A Hammer" is gonna hit VHS and DVD via Anchor Bay. Wonderfull news. You must be relieved.

Any chance at a brief theatrical run?

Blake
(p.s. "Hammer" will be one of my first DVD's. Just got a hold of a player, but no movies yet. Hope to see a lot of extras.)

Dear Blake:

Don't be shy, start your DVD collection with "Running Time," it looks terific. I'll try to get "Hammer" into some art houses, I guess, considering I have a brand new 35mm print. However, without a theatrical release, just coming out on video/DVD isn't a relief, it's sort of a failure.

Josh

Name: Blake Eckard
E-mail: bseckard@hotmail.com

Josh,

I just saw a really great movie last week that I've never heard of. Ever seen "Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise"? Greta Garbo is the lead and she's fantastic. Actually, I think it's probably the first picture of hers I've seen. Glark Gabel is her love interest. I just can't say enough about it. Wonderous camera work, great story, and damn good acting and directing. I did notice it isn't on your favorite films list. Ever seen it?

Surprised to hear you like "Sex in the City". Especially when you don't enjoy "The Soprano's". "Soprano's" for some reason always reminded me of some older code of filmmmaking. Like the show "Northern Exposure", there are times when the characters don't speak and the camera is allowed to just show the audience their feelings by dollying > in to a CU or Medium shot. It feels like it's from an old Ford or Welles film. "Sex and the City" I guess is just too damn contemporary...Too full of quick fads and unrealistic scenerios. It feels like it feels it's the coolest show on the tube...I'd call it the most pretentious show airing right now. Perhaps this makes no sense whatsoever, but it's something I've definately felt. Just some thoughts. Don't mean to be annoyingly negative.

Have a good one.

Blake

Dear Blake:

However, if you're going to be annoyingly negative, this is certainly the place to come. You know, I've never seen "Susan Lennox: Her Rise and Fall." Garbo is sort of amazing in her own weird cold beautiful way. BTW, I never said I don't like "The Sopranos," I said that I've never seen it. I have no idea how I ended up getting caught by "Sex and the City," since I actively try not to watch any series TV, but I did. And they know who their characters are, and they are able to write thematically for all of them. I love thematic writing and they don't do it in movies anymore.

Josh

Name: Christa
E-mail: SC798@aol.com

Dear Josh:

I've been reading your scripts alot lately..and they are so amazing! I think my favorite so far is Lunatics. It's very creative :o) I was wondering...do you think it will ever be produced into a movie? And what about your others? I'd really like to see those on the big screen :o) Keep up the great work!

Dear Christa:

"Lunatics" was made into a movie. Look around the website. Glad you enjoyed the script.

Josh

Name: Dean
E-mail: deanj@aol.com

Dear Josh:

I read what you wrote on the new version of Planet of the Apes, and everyone else, I would just like to say that, I loved the first version, and that you shouldn't be to hard on the second one, I loved it too. The thing is that they shouldn't even be compared. For one thins, the first one is already a classic, and (for me anyway) the purpose of a
> film is to make you sad, make you happy, give you a fright, it just makes you fell what you want to feel. So, basically, this very well made second version shouldn't even be compared with the first one, yeah, I know that mark motsenbaugh or whatever his name is, isn't even close to charlton heston, but as a movie, not a remake just a movie, it is very good. And I onl think this about this remake, because I thought the remake of Psycho was a mocary, and a disgrace.

Dear Dean:

Right. Thanks for writing in.

Josh

Name: David
E-mail: daa@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

Is there a big difference between directing a movie and directing for television?

Dear David:

I think so, although I've never directed a real Hollywood film. But there's certainly a difference between the TV I've done and the indie films I've made. On the films I'm in charge, on the TV shows I'm not in charge. Pretty simple.

Josh

Name: Cynthia E. Jones
E-mail: cynthiaejones@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

Ahh, the continuing drama of your web site so reminds me of home. I miss California. I've been whiling away the hours watching movies of all kinds, possibly using up the entire stock of the local video store. They are sadly lacking in good old movies, and mostly have recent, shitty films. So, it's like the "needle in a haystack" syndrome. One cool film I finally caught was "Lenny," the Bob Fosse biopic starring Dustin Hoffman. Shot like a combination of "Citizen Kane" and Fellini's "8 1/2," I was pretty impressed visually, and interested enough in Lenny to stick to the end. Some fims just look infinitely better in black and white, but of course, you know that.

Thanks for the recent list of extremely cool 30s and 40s actors. Sometimes people think I'm nuts when I know more about Katherine Hepburn than Catherine Zeta-Jones, but I don't think there are any contemporary actresses who could touch the great Kate. It's amazing how women's roles were so much stronger 70 years ago than they are today. What's happening? Will the madness ever cease? Have a great birthday, or I hope you had one. Wish I could join you at the coffee shop in Amsterdam for some "coffee."

yours in absentia,
cindy

Dear Cindy:

I'm still here in Amsterdam. Yes, "Lenny" has beautiful photography, but it's a biography about a comedian who was funny and it's not funny. I think that's unforgivable. I do love "Cabaret" though.

Josh

Name: Mary Cole
E-mail: marysaphirewings@aol.com

hello Josh!

Just passing through to wish you a remarkable Birthday!
Live Well, Laugh Often, Love Much
Mary C.

Dear Mary:

Thanks a lot. You too.

Josh

Name: Charles
E-mail: cscorder@hotmail.com

Dear Josh:

There are only a few films on your favorites list whose sequels also made it (the first two Alien movies, the first two Godfathers, and the first two Mad Max movies). What is it about these sequels that sets them apart from many others inflicted upon moviegoers past and present? And are there any other sequels or film series that you have enjoyed?

Besides the ones you list, I thought the first three Bond films with Connery were entertaining (especially "Goldfinger"), but the series declined from there. At least the Connery Bonds were watchable; that hasn't usually been the case since.

Charles

P.S. Saw "The Others" earlier this week and enjoyed it very much. It was the first movie that had scared me since "The Sixth Sense." You would probably dig it, too.

Dear Charles:

Yeah, the Sean Connery Bonds are the best, but I don't care about any of them. As a kid I liked the Warner Oland Charlie Chans and the Johnny Weismueller Tarzans, too. I've always liked the Three Stooges, which was a long-running series. The Thin Man films are also good. As to what's good about "Godfather 2," "Aliens," and "The Road Warrior," it's obvious -- they're great movies. They are the exceptions to the rule. Yes, it is possible to make a good sequel, but not very probable.

Josh

Name: From Everyone at the Movie Geek Salon
E-mail:

To Josh:

Have a great birthday!!!!!!!

Don't do anything we wouldn't do...that gives you plenty of leeway.

Dear Fellow Movie Geeks:

Thanks for the birthday wishes. I'm having a great time here in Amsterdam.

Love,
Josh

Name: Frederick
E-mail: frefref@mail.com

Dear Josh:

If you want to keep this a PG-13 site, try checking your language. And if you were going to be so sarcastic and roud about your awnsers, you shouldn't have let us ask you anything.

Dear Frederick:

I'm just a roud prick.

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: ben@internetben.com
Dear Josh,

Q. What's the best way to become a filmmaker?
A. Make a film.

Well, I have the script idea in my head, and everyone I act out the premise to laughs hysterically, so I guess a good idea would be to start asking for donations of money, labor, and talent. Is it impossible to have nothing but an idea and ambition and actually get a short film made? And how important is a production company, even if it's just a name? I have a name that I dream to see projected at the beginning of every one of my films, but when I start trying to get a piddly short, independent film project rolling, should I advertise as ACME Entertainment, or some guy looking to make a film?

Since I haven't written it yet, I guess there's time to make it correct. Maybe someday, I'll see my movies panned on your site for lack of structure, but just to get started, I'll take the experienced advice of an accessible director and make it tri-sectable.

To Mr. ???, even though Mr. Becker and I have had both friendly and not-so-friendly, and considerate and not-so-considerate Q and A transactions, he is usually great about putting the grudge off and answering an honest, subsequent, industry-related question. That counts for a lot and shows that his passion in life is film, not ridicule.

Josh, thanks again for always telling the truth. I hope to be able to hide a "Josh Becker" in the "Thanks To" portion of my future film. Remember, it isn't pride if it's true.

Keep inspiring and enlightening.
Ben

Dear Ben:

If you want to have a production company name, then use one -- I always have. And if you want to make a short film, you will, whether it's film or digital. I do suggest writing the script first, that way you'll have a chance to rewrite it. Remember, writing is rewriting. BTW, I already know someone that's used Acme Productions, I'm sure you can do better than that.

Josh

Name: Tony Woods
E-mail: mankind716@aol.com

Dear Josh:

You obviously have no respect for any of the soldiers in the Army who died, yes died, in Guadalcanal. Sure the Army "Mopped Up", but that doesn't change the number of Widows and fatherless children in 1942-43. I can agree with you on two things, one, there is alot of scenes that make no sense in the movie, such as on the ship when they show a close-up on the floor. Two, the confusion going on in the story. But if you listened during the movie, insted of having your hands down your pants, you would see, like every other half-witted idiot who saw the movie, that what the charicters are saying makes perfect sense. Put everything together and you will understand what they are saying. I also must say that some of the scenes in the movie, such as the baby bird, and the bats, are reflecting how nature delt with all of the madness going on. The unshaven faces I have no problem with, seeing that not every soldier had a full scale barber's shave during combat. I would also like to know your thoughts on the music behind the movie, I personally think the score is nothing short of perfect. I loved this book and movie, in fact, it's the best movie i've ever seen, and the best book I have ever read. I am deeply sorry if by this you are offended in any way, but I must comment on your review, and this is the only way I can.

Dear Tony:

Why would I be offended, were talking about a movie, right? And I think you mean "The Thin Red Line." I'm certainly casting no aspersions on the soldiers that came in to clean up at Gaudalcanal, but when you say Gaudalcanal, it now commonly means a U.S. Marine battle, and a very heroic one that hasn't gotten a proper film treatment yet -- I liked "Pride of the Marines" quite a lot, but it's only one man's story. Anyway, I'm glad you enjoyed the film.

Josh

Name: ___
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

OH GOD IT'S ME AGAIN! Yes! Basically, I took the time to read this site properly... and you really have took an effort... writing all those articles... etc. so I'm quite impressed. I was only surprised cos you seemed so laid laidback... are you ever a diva? And say.."Don't you know who I am!?"

Dear ___:

Well, unless you're Kevin Smith -- and I don't think you are -- I still don't know your identity. In the immortal words of Ricardo Montelban playing Khan, "Go, or stay, but do it because it's what you wish to do."

Josh

Name: ???
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

K, can I just say- not to you Josh Becker but to that other person that wrote in about me- that my email address is valid! And Josh... I do think that the whole idea of your own website is excellent... that's why I was surprised by your sharpness and rudeness. But anyway, I would like to ask you if there is any sort of other ambition that you have yet to achieve... or are you happy with everything so far? And can I also say to that boy that wrote in about me... if i said my surname was Ratner then would you be saying I filmed a dog do a poo... and Josh, don't you agree that filming a dog poo is an excellent way of starting out in the business... its great experience.... directors-in-training!

Bye bye my loves! This is probably the last time you will hear from me... maybe it depends if I get annoyed again!

Dear ???:

Look, I'm in Amsterdam in a coffeeshop smoking the greatest weed in the world -- in this case, Super Skunk -- and quite frankly I don't understand any of this dog poo nonsense. Start your own website, have a good time.

Josh

Name: ???
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

Well, I'm impressed with the quick response to my email... but you must understand I was not saying that you should help people get into the business, I was wondering, and this remains my question, why you could not take the few minutes to answer a boy's question for his project... and why you were so rash with some other responses. With all that said, I will be opening a website of my own and I humbly thank you for such a marvelous idea of what to put in the site! Please tell me if you would like the web-address!

Dear ???:

Is this a joke and you'll write back something like www.fuckyou.com? OK. What's the web address?

Josh

Name: David Orea
E-mail: apmorea@prodigy.net

Dear Josh:

In response to a question regarding a rumor that Fleming wanted Cary Grant for a true version of "Casino Royale," you mentioned that it would have been great if shot as written. Does such a script exist, or were you referring to the book? Also, I really enjoyed "Cycles." It's criminal that an excellent, fresh script languishes in development hell; it deserves to be made. Has anyone even done a big budget Biker Film with historical and social resonance? With all this Greatest Generation stuff the past few years, it seems like a no brainer. Thanks for the site.

Dear David:

"Cycles" has always seemed like a no-brainer to me, too. Regarding "Casino Royale," I was referring to the book, which is nothing like any of the movies. It's set when it was written, in 1953, and Bond is a a killer, with a scar across his face, and dead gray eyes, who happens to specialize in gambling. He drives a 1933 Bentley, and carries a .25 pistol with the grips pried off and the handle wrapped with tape so it lies flat in his pocket. It's wonderfully low-tech. It could still be done, too, although not with Cary Grant.

Josh

Name: Keith Schaffner
E-mail: Lordhtiek@aol.com

Dear Josh:

Hey, Happy Birthday! I am an aspiring filmmaker and I want to practice on film not video. So I figured starting with Super 8 is the best route. I have researched many websites on S8 but since you know the field could you help me out? What Super 8 camera do you recommend? I have also read that Kodak stopped producing Sound film. Is that how you used to capture sound or did you use a seperate recorder? As you can see I'm confused and I don't mean too bother you but can you tell me what equipment to start off with? In the future I'm planning to shoot a film pilot and I want to have the right equipment. Thanks.

Dear Keith:

When Bruce and Sam and I were young super-8 made sense because it was cheap. It's not cheap anymore. Yes, we used single-system sound right on the film. If you're going to go to that trouble, I say go 16mm. Get a Bolex, just like the one I have, and there you go. You can't shoot sync sound, but you don't need any batteries, either, because it winds up. My buddy has just shot a whole feature with one. Good luck.

Josh

Name: Fan X
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

Happy Birthday!

Dear Fan X:

Many thanks.

Josh

Name: August
E-mail: joxerfan@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

How cool! A famous Hollywood director is visiting your site. He was the one who directed those Long Dong Silver films, right? Gee, wouldn't it be sweet if we all could be famous directors like him!

Hey, just wanted to be the first one to wish you a very Happy Birthday!

Regards,

August

Dear August:

Thanks, dude. I'm having a great time.

Josh

Name: David
E-mail: david@dustdevil.com

Josh,

Okay, first of all, you'd think a famous director would be glad to reveal himself, and I'd sure like to know who is. Secondly, have you ever seen "The Sweet Lowdown" with Sean Penn? I think it's a good movie, Sean Penn does a really good job. The soundtrack is good, too. I hope we all get a chance to see "If I Had a Hammer" soon. Do you think Anchor Bay might release it on video and DVD? I know that's who did Running Time, at least.

Thanks,
David

Dear David:

Yes, I believe Anchor Bay will be releasing "If I Had Hammer" on video/DVD. I was just speaking with them this week. I don't know when.

Josh

Name: Darin Davis
E-mail: none

Hey Josh,

First of all I was wondering if you've ever seen "Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels" and "Snatch," both by Guy Ritchie. They both just gave me a big headache, "Two Smoking Barrels" especially. It seemed to go on forever. I think an hour and a half is the perfect length and most people who think they can pull off any longer than that are fooling themselves. Also, I think it's very sad that most movies today have to do that "cut every two seconds" crap to try to keep our attentions for an hour and a half, yet books take days, some even weeks to read and the only "gimmick" available is good storytelling. Do you think it's because most people read books to pass the time but they watch movies to be entertained? Finally, you said you watched a lot of movies as a child, but what about tv? Did you ever watch "Get Smart" or "MASH"? What are some of your favorite television shows? (if any)

Thanks,
Darin

Dear Darin:

I suppose I should first say that I am writing from my favorite coffeeshop in Amsterdam, Tops, on the Prinzengracht, which means the prince's canal. I'm smoking a big fat joint and workimng on one of their computers. I in fact did see "Lock, Stock . . ." and it went in one ear and out the other, although I vaguely recall it didn't make much sense. I loved TV as a kid, from the original "Star Trek" and "Get Smart" and "Gilligan's Island" and "The Green Hornet" up through M*A*S*H. I still watch "The Simpsons" and "Sex in the City."

Josh

Name: Richard Rothrock
E-mail: rothrock481@yahoo.com

Hi Josh,

I actually DON'T have a question. It was just interesting to discover what you were up to. My father rented you and Bruce Campbell the school where you shot LUNATICS. And he took me along to its premiere at the Star John R Theatre. I still remember Ted Raimi showing up in the ambulance.

I wasn't sure what happened to you after that until I stumbled on this site. Its also not that common to see a film director extolling the virtues of William Wyler these days. (I love Wyler but I'm really more of a George Stevens man). Not to mention the virtues of Robert K. Massie and David McCullough (I'm about 100 pages into "John Adams" right now). I wish more of them felt the same way.

Keep the faith!
Rich Rothrock

Dear Rich:

I'm about 400 pages into "John Adams" and enjoying quite a lot. Yeah, that school in Auburn Hills was a great place to shoot. You are a Wyler, McCullough, Massie fan, you are welcome here.

Josh


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