Q & A    Archive
Page 60

Name: Alan
E-mail:

Dear Josh,

just read your Quentin Tarantino interview, that's funny as hell. You said that you got in an argument with Quentin and his girlfriend, what was the argument particularly about?
-alan

Dear Alan:

First it was about "Die Hard" and John McTiernan, which Quentin said was a great film and that McTiernan was "the best director working," which I took total exception to. Then it was about "The Fisher King," which Quentin and his girlfriend at the time were also purporting to be a great film, and I didn't like it all. Nothing important, just movies.

Josh

Name: Jason Keller
E-mail:

Hey Josh,

Unfortunately I just heard the news about KEVIN SMITH. He will be greatly missed. Wow life is to short. And we should value every minute we have.

My heart goes out to his wife Suzanne and his 3 sons.

Dear Jason:

Mine, too.

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: benedict@oct.net

Josh,

I was formulating a very simple premise for a script, and as I thought about it, it has potential in many genres. It could be a farce, an allegory, a romantic comedy, and a thriller. I'm leaning toward romantic comedy since it's one I haven't tried yet. But have you ever had a general premise or an idea that could go many different ways? What did you do?

Thanks again.

Ben

Dear Ben:

Anything specific is better than anything general. If your premise is so non-specific that you think it will fit into anmy genre, it's probably too general of an idea. Think more specifically. Who is the lead character? Is it a cowboy, a detective, a soldier? Who is it? That ought to help lead you to your genre.

Josh

Name: Michael Anthony Lee
E-mail:

Josh,

I have just heard that Kevin Smith has passed away. This is a great loss and I was wondering if you could say a few words about this great man.

Maybe an essay or something.

Thank you.

Michael

Dear Michael:

I only worked with Kevin Smith once, on the very last episode of "Xena" that I directed, "Soul Possession." I had met him quite a few times before that over the years and he was always friendly and pleasant to me. When we finally worked together I found Kevin to be a really terrific actor, loaded with energy, very interested in all the scenes he was in, and always thinking about how to improve his scenes. He continually came up with absolutely wonderful improvised lines, several of which made it into the show. For a guy that was ridiculously handsome, he was also incredibly humble, sweet, and kind -- an amazing combination I haven't run across very often. In fact, Kevin was so wonderful to work with that I called him before I left New Zealand to tell him so. He said he'd never had a director do that before. In this western movie idea Bruce Campbell and I have been kicking around we were thinking of Kevin for the other lead role. I never heard a negative or unkind word spoken about Kevin Smith. He was an honest-to-God terrific human being, as well as a fine, dedicated actor, and he will be sadly missed. I'm glad I knew him.

Josh

Name: John Walter
E-mail: basebalzac@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

I just read that scientists in Texas have cloned a cat, evidently in response to (I'm not joking) an enormous demand for cloned pets. Where do you stand on the issue of cloned pets?

Dear John:

Is there a shortage of cats I didn't hear about? It seems to me that the Humane Society is overloaded with them, why bother cloning them? BTW, what's red and white and comes in a test tube? Bozo the Clone.

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: benedict@oct.net

Josh,

Thanks for your comment. I doubt I'll see CK again anytime soon, but maybe, as far as the news reel, it was more effective in the days when theatres showed news at the beginning.

But I'd really like to hear your thoughts on comedy. I once read a script and laughed two or three times out loud, but the movie was very funny. Do you think that comedy is harder to write?

Ben

Dear Ben:

Comedy is absolutely harder to write than drama. In a drama if you know what the situation is you can just get people talking and have a scene. In comedy you have to come up with jokes and funny lines, which is a very specific task that most people haven't got the slightest clue how to do. And just because you think it's funny doesn't mean anyone else will.

Josh

Name: ISABEL
E-mail: GODWIT @CLEAR.CO.NZ

PLEASE FIND ME pATRICK gOLDSTEINS la tIMES ARTICLe ON FE6 IN cALENDAR la. AND jANET.. article on Feb 11 same place. Much obliged.

Dear Isabel:

Jump in a lake.

Josh

Name: Laura
E-mail: Cyanexwp@hotmail.com

Hello Josh,

I hope you don't mind that I ask you this, but:
Has Ted Raimi or Bruce Campbell a girlfriend?
Thanks!!

Dear Laura:

Bruce has a wife (his second) and grown children. Ted's single, though. He generally has a girlfriend, but I don't know about right now.

Josh

Name: Mark Burnett
E-mail: amerispjy@hotmail.com

Dear Josh,

How have you been doing lately? I just want to say that I am a fan of your works and your beliefs involving the film business. So, tell me, do you have anything new that you are thinking about shooting? I am still waiting to watch "If I Had A Hammer". From what I heard, it sounds fascinating. I want to see it. I will sooner or later. Josh, I am curious, why don't you submit anything to festivals? Have you ever done this? What is wrong with sending work to Sundance or Cannes?

Dear Mark:

There's nothing wrong with it other than I've never gotten into Sundance and I've submitted three different films. Whatever it is they're looking for my films don't have -- I think it's nonsensical artsy-fartsiness, combined with already having a distribution deal, so I don't feel too bad. In fact, I've never gotten into any major festival. I have had films in many mid-level and minor festivals and there are no deals to be gotten at those. People seem to think that if you submit a film to a festival you just get in. Not true.

Josh

Name: ALAN
E-mail: picquickstudio@aol.com

Hi Josh

Have you heard the news today that Kevin Smith(Ares) has sustained serious head injuries whilst in China making a new movie?It seems he was not injured on set but news is very sporadic because of the Chinese New Year.Apparently his family have flown to Beijing to be with him.

Dear Alan:

Yes, I knew. It's terrible. Kevin Smith is as nice and professional of person as I've ever worked with. I wish him and his family all the very best and I sincerely hope he fully recuperates.

Josh

Name: Ben
E-mail: ben@oct.net

Josh,

Do you think that people visualize comedy when they read it? It seems like it would be hard to write comedy since so much humor is the work of the actors (or, at least, they enhance funny lines/situations), that a comedy script wouldn't be as fun as the movie.

Also, I went on another "old movie" stint just to see what I could find in them, and, although no one endorsed "Horse in a Grey Flannel Suit" on this site, I'll still say it was boring. But "Citizen Kane," however, is heavily endorsed and I found it just as boring. Who was the main character that we followed through the set-up, inciting moment, and the climax? And most importantly, wasn't the ten-minute, news reel exposition telling us that Kane was rich, powerful, and eccentric just a bit over done? Isn't good screenwriting concise screenwriting? Everything they said could have been done in a LOT shorter time, so why was that movie so good?

Thanks.

Ben

Dear Ben:

Try "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" instead, Disney films are for the birds. And if you don't get "Citizen Kane," I'm not going to try and convince you. I do have to say that since it's one of the most beautifully photographed movies ever, if you didn't see it in a theater then you didn't see it. The newsreel isn't ten minutes long, either. Nor is it over done -- it's just like a newsreel of the time. And had we seen the film in the theater at the time, we may all have been fooled into thinking it was an actual newsreel -- as Welles intended -- since it goes directly into the newsreel without titles in front of it and would have come right after other actual newsreels. I also don't understand your problem with the film being too long, considering it's not even two hours. I don't hear anyone bitching about the incredibly distended running times of most recent movies, like "Magnolia" or "Lord of the Rings," coming in at three hours! I think you need to watch "Kane" again and pay more attention this time.

Josh

Name: Jon Hynds
E-mail: albffp@omninet.net.au

Josh,

Do you lament the end of the studio era & above all the destruction of the MGM backlot?

Cheers Jon

Dear Jon:

I don't lament the "destruction" of the MGM backlot--when real estate prices skyrocketed in LA all the studios dumped their backlots. I do lament the demise of the studio system, though. Back then there was a logical way to work your way up through the system, and there also happened to be someone in charge that actually took responsibility for the studio's product. There's no out there now like Darryl Zancuck, Hal Wallis, Sam Goldwyn, Irving Thalberg, or even Harry Cohen, people that actually had taste in movies that could greenlight pictures. That I do lament.

Josh

Name: Patrick
E-mail:

Dear Josh,

What do you think about black comedies? Do you think that they are worth writing? I have this idea for a black comedy. Should I write it? Or are black comedies not the thing to write these days? What do you think?

Dear Patrick:

What? There's been too many of them lately? Nobody knows what "the thing to write these days" is anyway. Just write what you feel and then you've got a chance of doing something good. If you write what you think other people want, you're doomed from outset.

Josh

Name: August
E-mail: joxerfan@hotmail.com

Dear Josh:

Knowing your distaste for the Oscars these days, I bet you were nonetheless pleased to see Ngila Dickson nominated for "Lord of the Rings." Did you have occasion to work much with her, or were costumes pretty much taken care of by the time you got to the set?

I also noticed that one Grant Major was nominated for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration, and I see he worked on "Amazon Women." Any memories of him?

Thanks,

August

Dear August:

I know Ngila and Grant, and I worked with both of them quite a bit. Both of them are very nice, talented people and a joy to work with. The way it worked on Xena was that the director arrived in New Zealand two weeks before they began shooting their episode so that they could do all the prep work with the various departments, like costume and art direction, as well as casting. I would then meet with Ngila -- who does the best sketches of any costume designer I've ever worked with -- right away, then usually once or twice more, as well as all the head of department meetings. I would meet with Grant and the other art department folks many times before we'd begin shooting. Grant wasn't the head of the department, though, Rob Gillies was production designer. Once we began shooting I wouldn't see any of those people again until I came down for the next episode since they almost never came out to the set. Lucy used to torture Nigla, in a very friendly way mind you, by singing "Hava Nagila" everytime she saw her.

Josh

Name: David
E-mail: david@dustdevil.com

Josh,

I was wondering what you thought of Roger Corman. He directed the version of "Little Shop of Horrors" that later inspired the musical, he's produced hundreds of B movies, and in all the interviews I've seen him do, he genuinely seems to like what he does. He also employed Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, and Peter Bogdanovich before their careers took off.

Thanks,
David

Dear David:

Other than the fact that he's an incredibly shitty filmmaker, I guess he's okay. There isn't a single legitimately good picture among all those hundreds of films he's made. For a while there in the 70s he was releasing top-quality foreign films, so he's got that going for him. He's also good in his tiny part in the senate hearing scenes of "The Godfather Part Two."

Josh

Name: Diana Hawkes
E-mail: upon request

Dear Josh:

Wouldn't ya know it. I post asking about the autograph, and it comes in the mail that *same* afternoon.
So let's see, can I have a million dollars? heheh.
(You're life is WAY more than 6 photos, honey. I got the flop sweats reading a passage in your Alaska Journal. Lordy Josh!)

You're right, Julius is more blonde isn't he. I was thinking more in terms of the tossled coiff. (I haven't seen a recent shot of Rob.)

Yep, that 7 yr. old actress was more of a professional than Tawny Katain in that regard now wasn't she!

A "shipper" is a fan that enjoys and actively rooted for the Xena/Ares dynamic once his character was introduced on X:WP. As in "relationshipper". We're a fun bunch.

Dear Diana:

I'm glad you got the autograph.

Josh

Name: Maddy
E-mail: londongirl39@hotmail.com

Dear Josh:

I have a passion for writing and directing. I am 14, and I know this is my destiny. I don't know where to go after High School to persue my driving destination. I have some opportunities floating over my head at present, yet if I take them, I won't have to go to college? I don't know where I can get the education and 'requisites' required for such jobs; please help.

Dear Maddy:

The requisites for being in the film business haven't got a thing to do with college. No one in Hollywood cares one iota whether you've gone to college or not. The requisite is, do you have something they want? I'd say start writing as much as you can now so that by the time you're eighteen you know how to write a script so you can come to Hollywood and duke it out with everyone else. As a little note, just because you feel it's your "destiny" doesn't mean you'll get it without a lot of hard work.

Josh

Name: Diana Hawkes
E-mail: upon request

Dear Josh:

Holy Toledo! You mean my name and all is popping up on Rob's screen?...The big cheese himself?...oh crap...I feel a case of the giggles comin' on...

There's a thousand things I'd ask you to pass on to him but I'm drawing a blank in the haze of my ardor...I feel woozy...

You know what, if you care to please let him know that a great many Xena fans are relieved and happy he and Lucy's current pregnancy is doing great. I saw Julius with Lucy on her ET interview Monday, and he has hair just like Rob!

I saw you were slated for an interview at Whoosh! online. I hope you reveal lots more fun shannagins esp. on the set of Soul Poss. By the way, "If the Shoe Fits" re-ran the other day, and we all had a nice long discussion of it, and there was nothing but praise. We all kept throwing in little comedic flairs we loved. I really feel you were the Goldfinger of the comedy episodes Josh.

I guess I have no question today! But please tell Rob this "shipper" thinks he's terrific, sensational, the bomb! Does he even know what a "shipper" is?

oh and P.S.-- Did you happen to get my autograph request I sent to Shirley? It had a copy of your cats' pic at the top. You raise some fiesty cats! Becker cats obviously don't take any guff from man nor beast!

Dear Diana:

I signed the picture and sent it off. It was an amusing collage -- my life boiled down into six photos. What do you mean Julius and Rob have the same hair? Rob's hair is reddish brown and Julius is as blond as can be. Of course, I was blond when I was little and it turned brown eventually, so who knows? I don't know what a "shipper" is, either. Wasn't that little girl in "If the Shoe Fits . . ." terrific? I thought so. She always knew her dialog and never blew a line. Incredible for a seven-year-old.

Josh

Name: Neil
E-mail:

Dear Josh,

Does Sam really wear a suit and tie on set like Hitchcock? When did he start doing this?
Just curious, which one of his movies do you personally like the best?
Thanks, Neil

Dear Neil:

Yes, Sam does where a tie on the set, but not a jacket (except possibly a crew jacket). He didn't do that on "Evil Dead," so I guess he must have started on "Crimewave." Personally, I like "Evil Dead" the best because of its rawness.

Josh

Name: Steven Millan
E-mail: stevmedia@aol.com

Dear Josh:

I really enjoy your website,with its thoughtful articles(and essays)and heavily honest film reviews(I feel the same way about the current state of Tinseltown movies as you do,and I won't even ask you about your thoughts on "Scream","Blair Witch Project","Titanic", and "Star Wars(Episode 1):The Phantom Menace",since your FAQ pages openly answers those for me),as well as your hurtingly truthful insight of the Hollywood filmmaking business(something that both William Lustig and Tom DeSimone strongly feel the same about).You're also a helpful,positive guide to many aspiring writers/ filmmakers(such as myself)with your experienced view of the Tinseltown industry and business,and I'm proud of you for sticking to your filmmaking vision and not changing it to applease the corporate industry suits. You're a wonderful filmmaker,and I hope to see you back behind the camera again real soon(and your current movie getting a release of some sort),and I wish you all the best on your future projects.

Dear Steven:

Thanks for all the nice comments. Bill Lustig has problems with modern Hollywood? Does that mean he can't get "Maniac Cop 5" financed? Or is it some other movie with maniac in the title? One of the few positive things that can be said of contemporary Hollywood is that they aren't making needlessly violent films like "Maniac" or "Maniac Cop."

Josh

Name: Jackie
E-mail: trickey28@aol.com

Josh,

I loved the movie "If I Had A Hammer"! I think it's your best work ever. I thought the music was great. It's not a mainstream movie. I can imagine it showing in the artsy theaters like the Maple Theatre in Birmingham. If u know what I mean. My favorite part was a scene only one of my friends and I understood...when u realize the girl slept with the club owner. Music has such and impact in everyone's lives. Anyway, I want to see it to absorb the whole thing again since so much time has past. Please try to push for the big screen. There is nothing better!
I always thought of u as a highly intelligent guy. Maybe too intelligent
Just try to relax and enjoy the movies instead of critiquing so harshly. I know it must be hard for u to do. Some movies are meant to be thought provoking and other mindless.
I wish u great luck and I'm always looking for your name in the credits.
By the way, I thought ur answer to Kunal was so funny!

Dear Jackie:

Ah, subtlety! Not everyone got that idea as you did. A friend of mine actually got a bit angry at me for not having any resolution to Lorraine and the club owner's relationship, which is there -- you got it -- but doesn't club you over the head. Anyway, I didn't defend myself and point it out, I just let it go. If you don't see it then it's not there. As far as being a harsh critic, that's who I am, I can't turn it off or on, it just is. Thanks for the nice review. By the way, are you the Jackie that works for Mrs. Raimi?

Josh

Name: Mary Cooks
E-mail:

dear Josh,

I am going to write a screen-play that I want to be written in real time. I know it is a hard thing to pull off, but I intend to make it work. I am confident that this story would work down on paper. There is a problem. I was asking screenwriters on Project Greenlight what they thought. Some of them liked the story, but they didnt like the idea of it being in real time. They think it was used too much which I do not think. I think it has been used two times effectively, with films: Running Time and Rope. Anyway, most of them thought that if it is just a spec script, then I wouldnt be "allowed" to write a script in real time because the director would not allow it. Is this true? Do I have to shoot it myself? What is your advice?

Dear Mary:

I say write what you want to write and write the way you want to. The chances of selling a spec script are so slim I wouldn't let that influence you. And if it turns out really good it will be because you stuck to your original concept, not because you listened to wannabe screenwriters on a silly website based on a silly TV show. Rob Tapert's theory about "Project Greenlight," which he and I just watched the other day, is that Damon and Affleck found a poor schmuck that absolutely couldn't handle what was being thrown at him and was being set up to fail so we could all watch it. I personally found the show pathetic and aggravating. And maybe you ought to consider shooting your script yourself, that way it'll get made. Good luck.

Josh

Name: Will Armstrong
E-mail: andykaufman@rogers.com

Hey Josh,

I got a couple of questions for ya. I just picked up "The Shootist" on DVD and am once again obsessed with John Wayne movies. So I was wondering, what's your favorite Wayne flick?

I recently saw Omar Sharif walking around in a crappy little mall up here In Ontario, Canada!!! I heard rumours that he had a son that lived in my city, Ottawa, but I never thought anything of it. I asked around and I heard that he was always in this mall and that he was a bit of a nut job. I never approached him because I'm a star struck ,shy ass guy. So... for my second question, did you ever approach any Jimmy Stewarts or Chuck Hestons when you were in LA? I remember hearing that you met Scorsese and De Niro once...is that true or am I just imagining things?
Thanks!

Dear Will:

I really like "The Shootist," I think it's an excellent film all around. And from Dino De Laurentiis no less. My favorite would have to be "True Grit," I simply love that film. It has a great sense of period and the Duke just couldn't be better. Robert Duvall as the bad guy, "Lucky" Ned Pepper, is terrific, and Dennis Hopper's death scene is harrowing--"He never done me wrong 'til he killed me." I like all Wayne's pictures with John Ford, particularly "The Quiet Man" and "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon." If you want to see a really odd, interesting Ford/Wayne picture, check out "The Long Voyage Home," beautifully photographed by the great Gregg Toland. Anyway . . . I never met James Stewart, but I did very briefly meet Charlton Heston. And I also met Robert DeNiro and Martin Scorsese, who came and spoke for a class I took at Sherwood Oaks Experimental College in 1977, which was located above a shoe store on Hollywood Blvd. Other speakers for that class were: Mel Brooks, Gene Wilder, Francois Truffaut, Robert Wise, and Robert Aldrich. It was pretty cool. I've met a bunch of other celebrities in passing: I worked on a music video with Mariah Carey when she was quite young (like 1990-91), and with Ted Nugent, and I directed Anthony Quinn in that Hercules TV movie. And I know Lucy Lawless pretty well. I knew Jean-Claude Van Damme slightly at the beginning of his career and actually spent a few days working on script with him (he would stand up occasionally and proclaim, "Arnold and sly, they fear me! I'm coming to take their place!"). At Sam Raimi's stag party I hung out with Bill Paxton and John Woo for the evening, which was fun. John Woo and I were both developing films for Sam and Rob in 1988-89 (he was doing "Hard Target" and I was doing "Lunatics") and I'd see him everyday at the office. I met Liam Neeson on the "Darkman" set. I've met Joel and Ethan Coen several times at parties. I met Holly Hunter and Francis McDormand when they were living in Sam's old house, with Joel and Ethan Coen. I met Emile Sitka on the "Crimewave" set. I used to be good friends with a guy who was good friends with Christopher Isherwood and we all went to the movies together a number of times. That was impressive to me. Bruce, Sam, and Rob, however, have met way more celebrities than me.

Josh

Name: Fabio
E-mail: longtom@oeste.com.ar

Dear Josh:

Well, ghurkas in Argentina. They were yes, in 1982, in Falklands (Islas Malvinas). We were under a dictatorship that did send troops to the isles and Thatcher take the chance for became more popular in England. Well, much of the troops that our drunk dictator send to the south were young men of 18 or 19 years making the obligatory military service. These kids meets the ghurkas, the most hard warriors of the britanic history (I think). I hear terrible stories about they, noticed not from the media of course, but from people with sons or brothers in the war. Ghurka is a word that inspires fear in argentine people who suffered these times. Nonetheless, one must say that the failed war from the dictatorship open the doors to the demochracy... Are the winds of the fate, I suppose...
I am reading Devils Dogs now, and Sgt. Dan Daly touched my heart.

Best, Fabio

Dear Fabio:

Interesting to know about the Ghurkas. They are indeed the toughest warriors ever to serve with the British Army and may well be the toughest soldiers in the world. They have been very highly decorated and have distiguished themselves in many wars. I don't think any soldiers in the world want to come up against those guys. I'm glad you're enjoying "Devil Dogs." I just hope that I do the memory of Gunnery Sgt. Dan Daly honor.

Josh

Name: Jason Roth
E-mail: rothj@student.gvsu.edu

Hey Josh,

Recently got to see Cleveland Smith, boffo short!
I haven't laughed harder at anything in quite some time. "Dear God, a towering oak!!" Too funny. Is Tim Quill still in the acting biz? He's great in TSNKE and all his other Becker/Raimi appearances.

About to view Black Narcissus on your recommendation,
Jason

Dear Jason:

I hope you're watching the DVD because it's one of the really great-looking movie. As a little note, the director of photography, Jack Cardiff, one of the great DPs of all time and about 97 years old, supervised the DVD transfer. I haven't seen Tim Quill in quite a few years, but he never was really an actor. I think he's actually a salesman. He was the star swimmer in our high school.

Josh

Name: Amber Michener
E-mail: salem742@yahoo.com

hi,

My name is amber. I understand that you wont read any scripts, i am only 14 years of age. Me and my friend are going to make a movie but we need a director and i know you probably wont be it, cause you have a lot to do and so i was wondering if you can email me some stuff about other directors or or stuff about you. Iam asking this because we need a lot of help to do this movie. Some adults have to be in it and some other kids. The mian charecters are me and my friends danielle davis. So if you can please just please send us an email or just give us some advice we'd really like it a lot. Oh and by the way are movie is called " Lost child of Leadville ". It will take place in Leadville Colorado. So will you please please help us . Thankyou for reading this. (we can use a lot of help and advice!!!!!!!)

Dear Amber:

I was making movies when I was fourteen, so can you. Go make the movie. Have fun doing it. My advice is get coverage -- meaning you shoot the whole scene in a wide shot, then you shoot the whole scen again in one actor's close-up, then you shoot the whole scene again in the other actor's close-up, etc. This way you can then edit. Good luck.

Josh

Name: Allun VanMeter
E-mail: quitter@teenagedirtbag.com

Dear Josh:

Where was Evil dead filmed exactly?

Dear Allun:

Principal photography was in Morristown, Tennesee from Nov. 1979 through January 1980. There was then extensive pick-up shooting back in Michigan for the greater part of 1980.

Josh

Name: Maya
E-mail: chipssssy@hotmail.com

hi,

i'm a lebanese girl, studying travel and tourism at university. it's my last year and i have to present my senior project by the end of the year. i have chosen to create a beirut walk of fame in lebanon where actors and singers from the middle east will be honoured with a star. but it's really a hard project and i need the help of too many people. i would really appreciate it if you tried to help me giving me some information about how to create such a project, how to choose which stars must get a star, how much does it cost, the ceremonies undertaken and all the information that i could really need.
the hollywood walk of fame is a very important project and that's why i'm really interested in learning more about it in order to make a project similar to it.
Your urgent reply will be highly appreciated.
Best regards,
Maya.

Dear Maya:

The Hollywood Walk of Fame is run by the city of Hollywood. I think you'd need the city of Beirut to help and finance such a project. Doesn't Beirut get bombed all the time? Is it really the best spot for such thing? I don't think I'd go to the Hollywood Walk of Fame if I thought I might get bombed (although I have gone there when I was bombed, har har). Personally, it sounds like too big of a deal for a school project. Maybe you should just draw up the plans and idea and who you think should be there. I'm not an expert on this, I simply wrote an article about it ten years ago.

Josh

Name: Marcus Lofroth
E-mail: mackes_post@hotmail.com

Hi, Josh.

This is sort of a different question. After years of traveling and working, I´ve grown a big passion for writing (film scripts and books).
I consider myself a beginner on both areas and I´m going to take six months to learn more in every aspect of film making (yes, I know I can´t learn THAT much in six months).
What´s this, you´re probably thinking, another jobseeker?. The good part is that I get everything paid by EU and will be of no cost for my "employer".
Are you, or people in your organisation (,friends etc.), interested in an assistent?
I´ll send you more info on myself if you are.
Thank you \ Marcus.

Dear Marcus:

Other than Sam, we're all unemployed. I've never had an assistant, other than assistant directors, and that's a whole different issue. I don't even live in LA anymore. Good luck on your quest.

Josh

Name: kunal chandla
E-mail: franc186@yahoo.com

sir

myself is kunal . ijust want to know the songs
used in french movie "le cousin".pleeeese reply
i am trying to get those songs but i'm unable .so
sir pleease send me lyrics or something.
thanks thanks thanks thanks !

Dear Kunal:

Sorry, I never saw it. I do know all the lyrics to the songs in "Gigi," though, will that help?

Thank heaven for little girls
For little girls get bigger everyday
Thank heaven for little girls
They grow up in the most delightful way, etc.

Josh

Name: Michael Anthony Lee
E-mail: mal@kingston.net

Josh,

I have been coming to this site for the past three years now. Bruce Campbell sent me the link in an email (maybe to get rid of me and my constant questions) and I have managed to get a half-assed career rolling as a writer, thanks to you and your essays. Anyway, I notice about one in every five messages you get are one of these.
a) Someone wanting an IN into this biz.
b) A friend you didn't know you had.
or
c) Someone who has no clue and wants to know if you would like to film their Oscar winning idea.

I imagine Bruce, Sam, Rob, Ted and all the other guys have met similar people who are new friends once they started to build a name for themselves.

When did this start happening to you guys? I mean, when did it all change from just a bunch of guys trying to make it in the biz, to a bunch of guys being harrassed by people wanting to use you to get into the biz? After Evil Dead? ED2?

Now don't get me wrong, I came looking for free advice and I thank you and Bruce for giving it. That is different. I mean when did the leeches start showing up wanting to be in your next film or work on it or hey... want to read my script?

I am starting to get this now that I have a few things published and I was just wondering how you handle it.

Keep being yourself, Josh. Honesty kicks ass in a world full of liars.

Best,

Michael

Dear Michael:

Thanks, I will keep being myself since I've got nothing to lose (as Bob Dylan said, "When you ain't got nothin', you ain't got nothin' to lose"). I suppose we all started to get a bit hassled when we opened our offices in Ferndale, MI in 1980. We had those offices for about seven years and people used to just wander in all the time, many with "great ideas," some even with scripts. Since I haven't had any real successes, I haven't been hassled like Sam, Bruce, and Rob have been, though. I do my best to stay friendly about the whole thing, unless people get obnoxious or pushy. And I actually read all scripts sent to me for quite a long time. However, since they all sucked, I stopped reading people's scripts and my life improved a bit. Good luck to you and congrats on your successes.

Josh

Name: Jackie
E-mail: trickey28@aol.com

Dear Josh:

Am I ever going to see "If I Had A Hammer" on the big screen? I was there for the Detroit premiere but I want to see it again!!!!

Dear Jackie:

You are one of the very few people on the planet Earth that has seen it, and on the big screen no less. I'm still discussing the film's fate with Anchor Bay, but that wouldn't be for the big screen, that would be for video/DVD. I honestly can't imagine a theatrical distributor handling this film at this time. Since you have seen the film, why not write in and tell us what you thought.

Josh

Name: Brad Jordon
E-mail: aginmn@mail.com

Dear Josh,

I was just curious: Did you happen to catch the original "Diabolique" on Turner Classic Movies on Friday? I didn't see it actually on Friday night. I was too tired. So, I taped it and I just got finished watching it. I don't know yet if you have seen it or not, but SEE IT. It totally should be on a film buff's list, if they haven't seen it. I don't want to give anything away, but I really enjoyed it. It blew me away. I think you would like it if you liked "Wages of Fear".

Dear Brad:

No, I didn't catch it on Friday -- I was on an airplane -- but I will someday. And yes, I did like "Wages of Fear." For me it's nice to know there are still highly regarded films out there I haven't seen. But I will.

Josh

Name: chris
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

cinescape is now reporting that rob tapert has announced he is getting his detroit buddies sam raimi and bruce campbell together to do a low budget genre film. Will you be involved in this project too? I would have thought sam too busy with big budget projects to do low budget genre stuff again.

Dear Chris:

I happen to be writing from Rob Tapert's computer at this very moment and, although they (and I) are discussing many different projects, there isn't anything specific happing yet.

Josh

Name: John Chavers
E-mail: boarsnest1@hotmail.com

Dear Josh:

Is there any chance that the Cleveland Smith movie could get made or is it totally dead? I feel extremely lucky to own a copy of Wadders of the Lost Park.Every time I watch it I just wish there were more and more episodes. Cleveland Smith is a perfect role for Bruce (I can't take another Assault on Dome 4 or the Love Bug.The fans will probably never get Evil Dead 4 but they Need Cleveland Smith.

Dear John:

I don't have the money to make it, if that's what you mean. I don't have the money to make any movies right now. That doesn't mean someone still might not cough in the unforseen future. I'm not planning on it, but it could happen.

Josh

Name: court
E-mail:

hey josh,

i just have a couple questions. Have you ever seen the film Suspiria, and if so, what did you think of it?

Dear Court:

That's only one question and the answer is no.

Josh

Name: Marvin
E-mail:

Dear Josh:

One of your favorite quotes goes something like "In art, if everybody likes it, then it's probably bad." I just had a thought that kind of fits that quote.

For instance, let's look at the new movie "A Walk to Remember." I watched it and it was *really* sappy, but it left me feeling satisfied and I guess I could say I actually enjoyed it and so did many others. But if I imagine myself in your shoes or somebody elses in a critical viewpoint I could probably criticize this movie down to the nit-picky details and say that it encompasses everything wrong with a movie. But tell me, when it gets down to it as a whole, who really cares? As long as the audience was moved by what they watched, or felt something, or had taken a break from reality for awhile, then the filmmaker succeeded in adding to one of america's favorite past times--movies.

Lord of the Rings, another example, that I did not enjoy - Probably because unaware I had slowly entered "critic mode" the whole time. I even wrote a whole page or two about WHY the movie was just plain bad (perfunctory characters, shallow plot, etc.)--but what's my oppinion worth compared to the millions of audiences who actually enjoyed it?

I'm an oldie myself. I like old movies and am appreciative of it. But I bet you that most viewers today would rather sit through a showing of "a walk to remember," "lord of the rings," or "black hawk down" rather than a showing of "Citizen Kane," "Ben Hur," or "The Bridge on the River Kwai."

As had been said many'a times before. "There's always a critic..."

p.s. I'm quite fond of your thoughts here in this site, so don't think i'm bashing you or anything like that ~ just sharing my thoughts.

Just my two cents :)

Dear Marvin:

Hey, your two cents are worth exactly as much as my two cents. If the point is simply pleasing the masses, then just give them bread and circuses. If one is trying to elevate film to a higher level, which I believe it can be, then who cares what the masses like? Those are the folks buying Britney Spears records and watching "Survivor." I don't give a damn about them. All movies don't have to be big crowd-pleasing ordeals.

Josh

Name: Fabio
E-mail: longtom@oeste.com.ar

Dear Josh:

What is the only good thing of live in country with a govern in crisis? Well, no money for t.v. shows in the official channell, and then a lot of classic movies. In these past days, I see Casablanca (two times), M.Verdoux, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace, Grand Hotel, well a lot more.
Today was Shangai Express, from Von Sternberg. I never see so beautiful to Marlene Dietrich, so dinamic on a character... Later I see Dirty Harry again from years... Beyond I did enjoy a lot, I liked the details of the last death resembling the first, so the identical speech of Callahan to the bank robber and to the killer.
By the way, I read some days ago The Winds of Fate, and I like very very much. For an argentine is hard say I liked a ghurka, but that is. I was thinking in scenes of that script for days...
Best Regards
Fabio

Dear Fabio:

Joseph Von Sternberg's pictures really are worth watching, and no one ever made Marlene Dietrich look as beautiful. He paid so much attention to the photography that by "The Devil is a Woman" in 1936 he began taking the Director of Photography credit, too. I also really like "Morocco" and "The Scarlet Empress." What's the problem with an Argentinian liking a Ghurka? Are there Ghurkas there? Please explain.

Josh

Name: Will
E-mail: wdodson52@hotmail.com

Mr. Becker, I'm really curious to know if Anchor Bay gave you a reason or any info as to why they are now not releasing "If I Had a Hammer." I've always respected their commitment to high quality releases of independent and underground films. Of course I don't know what kind of people they are to deal with, and I was very dismayed to hear that they've decided to pass on "Hammer." I really enjoyed their "TSNKE" and "Running Time" releases. Your commentaries are worth the inflated price : )

Thanks.

Dear Will:

"Hammer" is not a dead issue at Anchor Bay, it only seemed like it for a moment. Yes, the do a good job with their releases, and they're nice people to deal with, too. I really hope this deal goes through now. Cross your fingers.

Josh


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